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Dr. Osama Khan

Electrical Engineering
Advisor: Prof. Pister
Research Interests: Batteryless wireless communication.

BIOGRAPHY
Dr. Khan is a research scholar at the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center (BSAC) and is responsible for the system level design of the Single Chip Mote project. Dr. Khan did his PhD at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor in 2013. In the summer of 2009, he worked in the RF division at Qualcomm in San Diego, CA. Between Feb 2014 and Nov 2014 he was at Psikick Inc. an ultra-low-power wireless startup where he developed a low-power crystal oscillator and a short-range radio front-end. Dr. Khan's current research interests are battery independent, robust, adaptive microsystems and their applications.

Self-Destructing Silicon [BPN744]
Funded under the DARPA Vanishing Programmable Resources (VaPR) program, this project explores the fundamental issues associated with making wireless sensor nodes disappear after achieving an objective. The MEMS Hammer is a micromachined device capable of storing mechanical energy and delivering that energy to a target. It has been used to fracture other microfabricated structures made of silicon and silicon dioxide. The MEMS Hammer is capable of storing a wide range of energies with the upper limit exceeding 10uJ. These devices have been characterized to determine the tradeoffs among energy stored, total stroke, and layout area. The MEMS Hammer is being developed for a variety of applications ranging from creating a self- destructing mote to creating jumping microrobots. A ratcheting system is being developed using electrostatic motors to create a fully automatic self-destruction system.


Current Active Projects:
BPN744
BPN803
 

     Last Updated: Mon 2017-Sep-11 10:35:07

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